John R. Neill. 

Beyond the Deadly Desert chronicled by Joe Bongiorno. Used by permission only.

 

Introduction Mainline Timeline Other Histories Dark Side of Oz Deadly Desert Munchkinland Poems & Parodies News & New Releases Appendices Daily Chronology Oz 'n Ends Royal Publisher of Oz Oz Stories Merchandise Home Book Reviews Ozzy Links

 

 

 

Oz Outside the Sovereign Sixty

 

 

     The list of works featuring Oz is enormous, with a great many of them seeming to have little or nothing to do with the world created by L. Frank Baum and his successors. Some are an extensions of, or twists on the popular MGM film, The Wizard of Oz, while others feature contexts or themes that are difficult to weave into the historic chronology of the Sovereign Sixty (commonly known as the Famous Forty), the original series of books written by Baum and his official successors (see the appendices for more details). 

 

   The trend of producing works that spun off of the book series, but was incongruous to their events, began in Baum's time with the revisions given to the screenplay of his 1902 Wizard of Oz musical extravaganza.  This resulted in the first Oz re-imagining that saw Baum's story transmogrified into something that bore only surface elements of his original book.  That it proved enormously successful was a sign of things to come.

 

   As author Paul Dana notes, "alternate universes can actually be a terrific place for some writers, especially those who feel caged by the extremely complex, contradictory and restrictive demands of the canon.  Compared to the canon, an alternate universe can be a place of tremendous freedom, where writers interpret things according to their own vision and take characters in their own direction."

 

    Although many of these works are wildly divergent from the Sovereign Sixty and its successors, many of these stories can be seen as taking place in an alternate Oz dimension, a possibility that is depicted in the canonical book Paradox in Oz, and if so, these titles can represent a kind of secondary or tertiary canon.  A brief explanatory note is included with each title or series for a better understanding of the work in question. 

 

    Where applicable, the following are arranged by the date of possible occurrence.  Click on the title for a cover image.  Underlined titles link to the story online.

 

Note: The following entries may include spoilers!

 

For other tales outside the Mainline Timeline, see The Dark Side of Oz and Parallel Histories

 

 

Date & Title

Author

Publisher/Publication

1845    

Lion of Oz and the Badge of Courage

Roger Baum

Yellow Brick Road Press

Lion of Oz

Roger Baum, Elana Lesser, Cliff Ruby

Lionsgate Films; Disney Channel

Note: Alternate history of the Lion and the Wizard, who in this version, knew one another intimately prior to the start of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Otherwise, a nice Oz adventure.  See Munchkinland for more of his titles. An animated full-length feature of the same name is based on this book with Jason Priestly doing the voice of the Lion, Dom DeLuise as the Wizard, and Lynn Redgrave as the Wicked Witch of the East.

 

 

 

1872-1898 

 

 

How the Wizard Saved Oz

Donald Abbott

Emerald City Press

Note: Fun story which presents a different history for Pastoria, Tip/Ozma, Mombi and the Wizard than presented in the Sovereign Sixty.

 

 

 

1898 

 

 

The Birthday Ban in Munchkin Land

Dev Ross

Treasure Bay Inc.

Note: This 44 page story, geared towards the youngest of children, about the Wicked Witch of the East banning birthdays, features several contradictions with the Sovereign Sixty, including a nine-year old Glinda, the origin of the Wicked Witch and the arrival of Dorothy.

     
The Adventures of a Man in Search of a Heart unknown The American Heart Association (1974); available online
Note: This animated Public Service Announcement (PSA) on the importance of exercise and taking care of your heart features the Tin Woodman searching for a heart.

 

 

 

1899 

 

 

The Wizard of Oz "Musical Extravaganza"

L. Frank Baum, Julian P. Mitchell, Glenn MacDonough

N/A

Note: This wildly successful 1902 stage play, produced by Fred R. Hamlin, represents the first alternate version of Oz. Much to Baum's chagrin, his original script—which hewed close to the book—was rewritten by the director, Julian P. Mitchell and Glenn MacDonough to make it more sophisticated to adult audiences. Among the changes are Toto becoming Imogene the Cow, the elimination of the Wicked Witch of the West, and a plot by Pastoria to win back his throne from the Wizard in the Emerald City. Dorothy's surname Gale, Pastoria and the Tin Woodman's real surname (Chopper) all originate from here. MGM's iteration borrowed Glinda's snowstorm (which replaced the book's mice save Dorothy and friends from the poppy-field).

 

 

 

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

L. Frank Baum, Otis Turner

Selig Polyscope

Note: The earliest surviving film adaptation of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is this 13 minute 1910 silent film, which, although compressed, comes the closest to the original source material until the 1939 MGM film. The film draws elements from several Oz books and the 1902 stage musical. Hiding in a haystack from angry ranch hands, Hank the Mule, Dorothy, Toto and Imogene the Cow discover a living scarecrow just before a cyclone carries them all away to Oz. There they they meet the Lion who attacks them, but Glinda magically appears and turns Toto into a Tiger to protect them, and the Lion backs down. After the Scarecrow finds a note from The Wizard saying he'll give his crown to anyone who'll take his place and let him return to Omaha, they head to the Emerald City, but on their way they find the Tin Woodsman and free him. Momba the Witch, however, covets the crown, and with the help of a giant flying frog, imprisons Dorothy and her animal friends. Dorothy throws water on the witch, who vanishes, and they make their way to the Emerald City, where the Wizard gladly crowns the Scarecrow and takes off in his balloon, leaving everyone in Oz.

 

 

 

The Wizard of Oz

L. Frank Baum, Larry Semon

Chadwick Pictures

Note: Despite the production credits of Frank Joslyn Baum, this 1925 silent film by Larry Semon, famous for featuring Oliver Hardy as the Tin Man, is easily the loosest and least faithful adaptation of Baum's story, most of which is jettisoned in favor of slapstick and a complicated plot. In it, Dorothy is an 18 year old girl who flirts with two farmhands who are in love with her. After they're all swept to Oz, the farmhands don the disguises of a Scarecrow and Tin Man in order to avoid being captured by King Kruel who has recently overthrown Prince Kynd. The film bankrupted the company and ruined the career of Larry Semon. This ninety-minute film is widely available and can be found in all recent versions of the 1939 Wizard of Oz film on DVD and blu-ray.

 

 

 

The Wizard of Oz

L. Frank Baum, Frank Joslyn Baum

Film Laboratories of Canada

Note: The first animated adaptation of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is this amusing short from 1933, written by Frank Joslyn Baum and directed by Ted Eshbaugh, concerning Dorothy and Toto's trip in Oz. This is the first adaptation of Oz to feature Kansas in black-and-white and Oz in color. There, after an entertaining introduction to the Scarecrow and Tin Woodsman, the explorers enter the Emerald City, where they meet a cackling Wizard who performs magic tricks for them. But when one of his hens lays an egg that won't stop growing, the Scarecrow and Tin Man attempt various ways to crack it, unsuccessfully, until Toto comes along with the Wizard's wand, and it hatches into a baby chick, which is reunited with its mother. This animated short is now widely available and can be found in all recent versions of the 1939 Wizard of Oz film on DVD and blu-ray.

 

 

 

The Wizard of Oz

L. Frank Baum, Noel Langley, Florence Ryerson, Edgar Allan Woolf, Victor Fleming

MGM, Warner Bros. Pictures

Note: The 1939 worldwide box-office phenomena whose story, themes, music (by Harold Arlen and E.Y. "Yip" Harburg), performances (notably Judy Garland, Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, Bert Lahr, Billie Burke and Margaret Mitchell) and onscreen magic helped propel the film to legendary status.  The film's yearly rotation on television went a long way towards keeping Oz a household name for years.  Though the film differs on various points lesser and greater from the book (44 differences have been cited), it was the most faithful version of the book that had, until then, been produced.

 

 

 

Toto: The Tale of the True Hero of Oz Brad Heisler Fanfiction.net
Notte: Based on the MGM-film: Toto gets in trouble in Miss Gulch's yard.
     

The Other Brick Road

Frederick E. Otto

Oziana 1989, The International Wizard of Oz Club

Note: This amusing short story from Oziana magazine is a take-off on MGM’s version of Dorothy’s start down the Yellow Brick Road.

 

 

 

A Simple Meeting

Alice

Yuletidetreasure.org

Note: Taking place shortly after Dorothy starts off on the Yellow Brick Road, in the MGM film, the Wicked Witch of the West pays Glinda a visit.

     
The Wizard of Oz: Beyond the Yellow Brick Road Media Vision D3 Publisher, Xseed Games
Note: Nintendo DS video-game based on The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. From Wikipedia: "The game follows Dorothy and her group of friends as they complete a task for the Wizard of Oz. He asks them to defeat four different witches. After this, he promises to grant each of the companions' wishes. Each of the witches has a magical egg that the player is supposed to collect... After the player gets these Oz turns against them and they have to go defeat him by traveling the yellow brick road... along the way you gain abilities by meeting the elemental spirits and by defeating the dragon masters."
     
Heart to Heart panda lover Fanfiction.net
Note: Based on the MGM film: The true feelings the Tin Man has inside right before he meets Dorothy and the Scarecrow.
     
Toto's Point-of-View panda lover Fanfiction.net
Note: Based on the MGM-film: Toto shares his perspective.
     
Always in My Heart Cynthia Hanson WogglebugLoveProductions
Note: Based on the MGM-film: A look into the thoughts and feelings of the Tin Man as Dorothy says goodbye.  This story is the sole property and trademark of WogglebugLoveProductions.
     
     
Dust Devil in the Sky hollywoodfreak Fanfiction.net

Story: Daisy from Arkansas and her dog Titi have an adventure similar to a certain Dorothy.  Daisy must use the Grand Heart Rubies to restore a war-torn Oz.

     
Abriana's Journey with Dorothy to Oz Dana Palladino Self-published (coming soon)
Story: Abriana Thomas (whom the inhabitants of Oz think is a good sorceress), Diana (her best friend from the 21st century who came along to overcome her lack of confidence), join Dorothy and Toto on their journey to Oz.
     

1900

 

 

The Land of Oz

L. Frank Baum, Otis Turner

Selig Polyscope

Note: Lost sequel to the 1910 silent film The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and Dorothy and the Scarecrow in Oz, and a loose adaptation of Marvelous Land of Oz, its plot is known only from a press release found in Motion Picture World catalog: The Emerald City in all its splendor with all the familiar characters so dear to the hearts of children - Little Dorothy, the scarecrow, the woodman, the cowardly lion, and the wizard continuing on their triumphal entry to the mystic city, adding new characters, new situations, and scintillating comedy. Dorothy, who has so won her way into the good graces of lovers of fairy folk, finds new encounters in the rebellion army of General Jinger [sic] showing myriads of Leith soldiers in glittering apparel forming one surprise after the other, until the whole resolves itself into a spectacle worthy of the best artists in picturedom. Those who have followed the two preceding pictures of this great subject cannot but appreciate "The Land of Oz," the crowning effort of the Oz series.

     

Dorothy and the Scarecrow in Oz

L. Frank Baum, Otis Turner

Selig Polyscope

Note: Lost sequel to the 1910 silent film The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, its plot is known only from a press release found in Motion Picture World catalog: "Dorothy and the Scarecrow are now in the Emerald City. They have become friendly with the Wizard, and together with the woodman, the cowardly lion, and several new creations equally delightful, they journey through Oz -- the earthquake -- and into the glass city. The Scarecrow is elated to think he is going to get his brains at last and be like other men are; the Tin-Woodman is bent upon getting a heart, and the cowardly lion pleads with the great Oz for courage. All these are granted by his Highness. Dorothy picks the princess. -- The Dangerous Mangaboos. -- Into the black pit, and out again. We then see Jim, the cab horse, and myriads of pleasant surprises that hold and fascinate."

     

Tales of the Wizard of Oz

L. Frank Baum, Harry Kerwin, Arthur Rankin Jr.

Crawley Films/Videocraft/Rankin-Bass

Tales of the Wizard of Oz #1

Larry Silverman (?)

Dell Publishing - issue 1308. Read here.

Return to Oz

L. Frank Baum, Romeo Muller

Rankin-Bass

Note: This 1961 animated series ran 150 episodes, inspired a 1962 comic book of the same name, and a 1964 animated television special called Return to Oz (not to be confused with the 1985 feature-length film), written by Romeo Muller who went on to write Thanksgiving in the Land of Oz. Socrates the Scarecrow, Dandy Lion and Rusty the Tin Man join Dorothy in various adventures. Both the Wizard and the Wicked Witch of the West are present in this cute series, which has yet to be released on DVD/blu-ray.

 

 

 

Journey Back to Oz

Fred Ladd, Norm Prescott, Bernard Evslin, L. Frank Baum

Filmation

Note: Produced in 1962, but not released until a decade later, this animated feature-length film wasn't released for another decade, and is an official sequel to the 1939 MGM film. It's perhaps best remembered for Judy Garland's daughter Liza Minellia voicing Dorothy, who gets swept by tornado back to Oz to discover new friends and a plot by the witch Mombi to take over the Emerald City. Other high-profile talents include Margaret Hamilton voicing Aunt Em, Ethel Merman the witch Mombi, Paul Lynde as Pumpkinhead, Mickey Rooney as Scarecrow, Milton Burle as the Cowardly Lion and Danny Thomas as the Tin Man. The story borrows Pumpkinhead from The Marvelous Land of Oz, but is otherwise an original screenplay. The 1976 television version added a live-action segment in which Bill Cosby played the Wizard.

     
The Wizard of Oz DiC; Elana Lesser, Cliff Ruby, Doug Molitor ABC TV series
Note: This 13 episode animated series debuted on Sept. 8, 1990.  It is a sequel to the MGM film, though it depicts Oz as a real place.  With the help of the Ruby Slippers, Dorothy and Toto return to Oz, reunite with the Scarecrow, Tin Man, Lion, Wizard and Glinda, and discover that the Flying Monkeys have resurrected the Wicked Witch of the West.  Only 11 of the 13 episodes have been released on DVD.
     
The Wizard of Oz Series Finale Cynthia Hanson WogglebugLoveProductions
Note: Author "gives a proper ending to the 1990 DiC Wizard of Oz cartoon series. The Wogglebug comes to rescue the Wizard who learns to practice real magic, after which they unite with Dorothy and her three friends as they prepare for their final confrontation with the Wicked Witch of the West." This story is the sole property and trademark of WogglebugLoveProductions.
     
The Wizard of Oz Series Finale 2: Search for a Missing Princess Cynthia Hanson WogglebugLoveProductions
Note: Sequel to the installment above. "Mr. Wogglebug comes to Dorothy one night to return her to Oz and unite the others in to find the missing Princess Ozma, the rightful ruler of Oz."  This story is the sole property and trademark of WogglebugLoveProductions.

 

 

 

1901

 

 

Shirley Temple's Storybook: The Land of Oz

L. Frank Baum, Frank Gabrielson

The Shirley Temple Storybook Collection: The Land of Oz; The Reluctant Dragon DVD; Legend Films, 2005.

Note: The first episode of Season 2's Shirley Temple Theater features this ambitious (for 1960) adaptation of The Marvelous Land of Oz. As with the MGM film and 1902 musical that predated it, the story was rewritten by Gabrielson, to include lengthy sequences of Lord Nikidik (Jonathan Winters) attempting to take over the Emerald City from Ozma (Temple) with the aid of Mombi (Agnes Moorehead).

 

 

 

How the Cowardly Lion Met the Hungry Tiger

Judy Bieber

Oziana 1980, The International Wizard of Oz Club

Note: Well-meaning attempt to relate the above incident, however, as per Baum’s Magic of Oz, it is clear that Gugu and the Cowardly Lion had never met one other prior to the events of that book.

     

Halloween in Oz: Dorothy Returns

Leo Moser & Carol Nelson

Alpimar Books

Note: First book in the Alpimar series of Oz books which immediately follow Baum's original Wonderful Wizard of Oz.  This series will borrow from some of Baum's later books, but will not follow them.  The intention is to craft a more developed fantasy series along the lines of Harry Potter.  The novel will explore the mystery of Dorothy's parents, explain why her house landed where it did and forge new territory into the alternate earth realm called Alpimar.  Christmas in Oz will follow.

 

 

 

1902     
The Oz Saga: Book One: The City of Emeralds Landon Parks Griffin Young Readers

Note: Re-imagining of Baum's saga following the Ozma of Oz.  Ozma and Pastoria are present, though the historical events are quite different than that of the original series.

 

 

 

1903 

 

 

Dorothy in the Land of Oz (aka.Thanksgiving in the Land of Oz, Christmas in Oz) 

L. Frank Baum, Romeo Muller

Muller-Rosen Productions (1980)

Dorothy and the Green Gobbler in Oz

Romeo Muller

Scholastic

Directed by Charles Swenson and Fred Wolf, this half-hour animated feature originally aired as a Thanksgiving cartoon in 1980. A slightly modified version was rebroadcast, removing any references to the Thanksgiving holiday. On video and DVD, this is known as Dorothy in the Land of Oz. A 61 page adaptation, Dorothy and the Green Gobbler in Oz, was published in 1982. Characters from Baum’s Marvelous Land of Oz and Ozma of Oz appear, although the story is considerably at odds with Baum's, particularly as it ends with Uncle Henry and Aunt Em coming to live in Oz, an event that occurs in The Emerald City of Oz.  The Toy Tinkerer is clearly a Nome, and is designed to look like Ruggedo.  The Gobbler makes an appearance in The Royal Explorers of Oz: Book 3, likely hitching a ride with the Parrot-Oxes (of Paradox in Oz), who brought him from a parallel universe.

 

 

 

1904 

 

 

Dorothy and the Magic Belt

Susan Saunders

Illustrated by David Rose

Random House (1985)

Note: The concepts in this Random House novella don't work with events in Oz history, e.g., Uncle Henry and Aunt Em's early discovery of Oz's existence, Nikidik's history, and the fact that Mombi is turned into an infant.  Dagmar in Oz attempts to reconcile these events, though that book incorporates other elements that don't harmonize with Baum.

     

Denslow's Scarecrow and the Tin-Man and Other Stories

(aka. Denslow's Scarecrow and Tinman)

W.W. Denslow

G.W. Dillingham Co.; M.A. Donahue and Co.; Perks Publishing; Hungry Tiger Press; Sunday Press Books

Note: This 1904 picture book published by G.W. Dillingham Co. presents two original Denslow stories (along with other Denslow stories) about the titular characters as if they were the actual performers of the 1902 stage play. Short on time, Denslow later used this as the final two installments (13 and 14) of his newspaper strip "Denslow's Scarecrow and Tinman." In the story's conclusion, Scarecrow mentions that they've been performing for two years and by story's end are sentenced to perform an additional year! This was reprinted in a 25 page booklet by Perks Publishing in 1946, then again in as Chapter 13: "The Scarecrow and Tinman Escape" by Hungry Tiger Press in their collection of Denslow's newspaper strips, The Scarecrow and Tin-Man of Oz. The Sunday Press Queer Visitors from the Marvelous Land of Oz publishes all of Denslow's strips (including these) in their original format.

     
1905    

His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz (aka. The New Wizard of Oz)

L. Frank Baum

The Oz Film Manufacturing Company

Note: Baum's 1914 screenplay only touches on elements of his first Oz book, and brings in so many new elements that Baum eventually used them as a basis for his ninth Oz book, 1915's The Scarecrow of Oz. Here, we see Baum's origin of the Scarecrow as a creature brought to life by nature-fairies. Many of the elements from The Scarecrow of Oz first make their debut here, although there are some differences. Dorothy appears without explanation from Kansas, the Wizard is a genuine wizard and Hank the Mule and Imogene the Cow have roles that are different than their counterparts in the 1910 film or 1902 musical. This hour-long film is widely available and can be found in all recent versions of the 1939 Wizard of Oz film on DVD and blu-ray.

     

The Emerald City: The New Adventures of Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz

Arnold Schildkret

Illustrated by Franczeska Angel

Xlibris (2011)

Note: Retelling of Baum's The Emerald City of Oz, with numerous variances.
     
1913    
The Pinkies and the Winkies Elizabeth F. Guptill Eldridge Entertainment House
Note: This 21 page pamphlet has been cited as one of several attempts to cash in on the success of the Oz phenomenon.  In this short story (written as a play), Dorothy—not Dorothy Gale; his one has a brother, Reginald, Tote—not Toto; this one is a child from Mars, and fairies called “Winkies”—not Winkies from Oz; these are considered bad fairies, join Santa, who takes wandering children back to Earth.

 

 

 

1914

 

 

In Search of Dorothy: What If It Wasn't a Dream?

David Anthony

Publish America

The Witch's Revenge

David Anthony

Frederick Fell Publishers

Dorothy and the Wizard's Wish

David Anthony

Coming soon

Note: (From the website:) "What if Dorothy’s trip over the rainbow was real? It’s twenty years later and we’re about to find out. Travel over the rainbow once again to the Land of Oz. Join the Scarecrow as he plans to transport himself, along with the Tin Woodman and Lion, to the land of Kansas to find Dorothy. But beware as the Wicked Witch of the West is back and she has plans to finally get her sister’s magic shoes and then destroy all the good in Oz. Whoever gets to those Ruby Red Shoes first controls the fate of Oz. With time running out, everyone is In Search of Dorothy." The third part of this trilogy is presumably still in production.

 

 

 

1940

 

 

Dorothy Returns to Oz

Sera Alexia

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Fan Fic Forums

Sequel to the MGM film takes place five months later when Dorothy discovers her trip to Oz wasn't a dream after all.

     
1942    
The Movie Ashleyinwriterland Fanfiction.net
Note: Dorothy, now 50, married with kids, goes to see The Wizard of Oz.
     
1968    
The Moons of Meer Warren Hollister; Judith Pike Henry Z. Walck, Inc.

Note: Written by two members of the The International Wizard of Oz Club, this is a fantasy about the adventures of two youths in a fairytale land.  Some Oz fans have claimed to have found the five colors representing the regions of the Land of Oz within Chapter 10.  While this may be true (I myself cannot find it), it's of no significance to Oz.

 

 

 

1899-1904

Tales of the Magic Land

 

 

 

1938  The Wizard of the Emerald City

Alexander Volkov

Ts.K.V.L.S.M. Publishing House (1939); Soviet Russia Publishers (1959); As Tales of Magic Land Vol. 1, Red Branch Press (1993, 2007); Chapter 5: "Ellie in the Clutches of the Ogre" was reprinted in Oz-Story Magazine #3, Hungry Tiger Press (1997)

1938  Urfin Jus and his Wooden Soldiers

Alexander Volkov

Soviet Russia Publishers (1963); Opium Books; As Tales of Magic Land Vol. 1, Red Branch Press (1993, 2007)

1938  The Seven Underground Kings

Alexander Volkov

Soviet Russia Publishers (1969); Opium Books; As Tales of Magic Land Vol. 2, Red Branch Press (1993, 2007)

1946  The Fiery God of the Marrans

Alexander Volkov

Soviet Russia Publishers (1972); As Tales of Magic Land Vol. 2, Red Branch Press (1993, 2007)

1946  The Yellow Fog 

Alexander Volkov

Soviet Russia Publishers (1974); Buckethead; As Tales of Magic Land Vol. 3, Red Branch Press (2007);

1946  The Mystery of the Deserted Castle 

Alexander Volkov

Soviet Russia Publishers (1976); Buckethead; As Tales of Magic Land Vol. 3, Red Branch Press (2007);

Note: If anything qualifies as an alternate or parallel Oz universe, this series by Russian-born Alexander Volkov does. With the exception of his very first book, which is a Russian adaptation of the The Wonderful Wizard of Oz written in 1939 and revised twenty years later. It's popularity led to five sequels from 1963 to 1975. Volkov took his series in an entirely different direction than Baum. His version of Oz was the “Magic Land” or Goodvinia, and although the characters bear certain similarities to Baum’s, they are also unique creations all onto their own. March Laumer, under his Opium Press label, had Mary G. Langford produce a translation of Urfin Jus and His Wooden Soldiers (published as The Wooden Soldiers of Oz), while Buckethead Enterprises of Oz published Laumer's own translations of The Yellow Fog (as Yellow Fog Over Oz) and The Mystery of the Deserted Castle (as The Secret of the Deserted Castle). The most well known, extant, and well regarded translations are Peter Blystone's (who initially published the first four stories as Tales of the Magic Land volumes 1 and 2 by Red Branch Press).  Currently, all six of Laumer's are available on Lulu.com. 

 

Some confusion had at one time arisen with Opium and Buckethead's versions, as they substituted the name Oz for Goodvinia, and Dorothy for Ellie, amongst other changes, when in fact the two are a quite distinct fairylands from one other. Blystone has corrected this in his more accurate translations. In 1974, Russian TV adapted the first three books as The Wizard of the City of Emeralds.

 

 

 

The Emerald Rain

Yuri Kuznetzov

Yaroslavl

The Witch Arachna

Yuri Kuznetzov

Yaroslavl

The Abalone Pearl

Yuri Kuznetzov

Yaroslavl

The Apparitions from Elming

Yuri Kuznetzov

Yaroslavl

Prisoners of the Coral Reef

Yuri Kuznetzov

Yaroslavl

Note: These are Russian sequels to Volkov’s final 'Magic Land' book, The Mystery of the Deserted Castle.

 

 

 

Further Tales of the Magic Land

 

 

In the Clutches of the Sea Monster

Nikolai Bachnow

LeiV

The Serpent with the Amber Eyes

Nikolai Bachnow

LeiV

The Treasure of the Emerald Bees

Nikolai Bachnow

LeiV

The Curse of the Dragon King

Nikolai Bachnow

LeiV

The False Fairy

Nikolai Bachnow

LeiV

The Curse of the Copper Forest

Nikolai Bachnow

LeiV

The Adventures of the Evil Magician Astozor and his Tailor Lowen Lowenbrull

Lazar Steinmetz

LeiV

The Encyclopedia of Magic Land

Lazar Steinmetz

LeiV

Note: From 1996 to 2002, these German titles were published continuing Volkov's Magic Land series. It is not known if they harmonize with the sequels produced by Yuri Kuznetzov or Sergei Sukhinov, or if they form a separate continuity.

The Iron Woodman and Strasheela in the Snow City

Liza Adams

Sovremen Literatura

The New Adventures of the Iron Woodman and Strasheela

Liza Adams

Sovremen Literatura

The Iron Woodman and Elli

Sergei Zaitsev

(unknown)

Buratino (Pinocchio) in the Emerald City

Leonid Vladimirsky

Astrel

Note: Not much is known about these additional Russian sequels (one written by Volkov's original illustrator Leonid Vladimirsky) from the late '90s.

 

 

 

"Ellie in the Emerald City," aka the Tales of the Emerald City series

 

 

Goodwin the Great and Terrible

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Armada Press (2010); Red Branch Press (Coming in 2014)

Gingema's Daughter: Book 1

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Armada Press (1999); Red Branch Press (2013)

The Fairy of the Emerald City: Book 2

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Armada Press (1999); Red Branch Press (2013)

The Sorceress Villina's Secret: Book 3

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Armada Press (1999); Red Branch Press (2013)

The Sorcerer's Sword: Book 4

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Armada Press (2000); Red Branch Press (2013)

Eternally Youthful Stella: Book 5

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Armada Press (2000); Red Branch Press (2013)

Parcelius the Alchemist: Book 6

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Armada Press (2000); Red Branch Press (2013)

Battle in Underground Land: Book 7

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Armada Press (2000); Red Branch Press (2013)

King Midgety: Book 8

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Armada Press (2001); Red Branch Press (2013)

The Sorcerer from Atlantis: Book 9

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Armada Press (2004); Red Branch Press (2013)

The Knights of Light and Darkness: Book 10

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Armada Press (2004); Red Branch Press (2013)

Note:  Following on the success of Volkov’s Magic Land series, Sergei Sukhinov has taken the alternate Oz universe into yet a third branch. Set fifty years after Volkov’s first book, The Wizard of the Emerald City (which was Volkov's adaptation of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz), Sukhinov has forged a new series continuing the adventures of Ellie.  This is more of a ten-volume Tolkeinesque-styled saga. Goodwin the Great and Terrible is a prequel to the "Emerald City" series describing how Goodwin arrived in the Magic Land and constructed the Emerald City. These are now available in the U.S., thanks in no small part to the superb translations by Peter Blystone. 

 

 

 

"Fairy Tales of the Emerald City"

 

 

Corina the Lazy Sorceress 

Sergei Sukhinov 

Eksmo Press (2000-2001)

Corina and the Ogre

Sergei Sukhinov

Eksmo Press (2000-2001)

The Apprentice of Sorceress Villina

Sergei Sukhinov

Eksmo Press (2000-2001)

The Young Dragon

Sergei Sukhinov

Eksmo Press (2000-2001)

The Crystal Island

Sergei Sukhinov

Eksmo Press (2000-2001)

Corina and the Magic Unicorn

Sergei Sukhinov

Eksmo Press (2000-2001)

Three in the Enchanted Forest

Sergei Sukhinov

Eksmo Press (2000-2001)

The Black Fog

Sergei Sukhinov

Eksmo Press (2000-2001)

The Lord of the Winged Monkeys

Sergei Sukhinov

 

Bastinda and the Winged Lion

Sergei Sukhinov

Oziana #37, The International Wizard of Oz Club

Note: These later volumes relate the histories of the characters in Sukhinov's ten book saga mentioned above. English translations of these will also be available some time following the publication of Sukhinov's first series. This will include two stories that were written, but never published.

 

 

 

1908 – 1999 March Laumer’s Oz

 

 

1905  The Fairy Queen in Oz

March Laumer 

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com 

1910  The Charmed Gardens of Oz

March Laumer

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

1910  The China Dog of Oz

March Laumer & Ruth Tuttle

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

1911  Uncle Henry and Aunt Em in Oz: The Oz Book for 1911

March Laumer

Vanitas Press: Lulu.com

1912  The Careless Kangaroo of Oz: The Oz Book for 1912

March Laumer 

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

1913  The Crown of Oz

March Laumer & Michael J. Michanczyk

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

1943  The Vegetable Man of Oz: The Oz Book for 1943

March Laumer, Hakan Larsson, John Plummer, Eileen Ribbler, and Michael Vincent

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

1944  The Magic Mirror of Oz: The Oz Book for 1944

March Laumer 

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

1947  The Frogman of Oz: The Oz Book for 1947 

March Laumer 

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

1953  The Umbrellas of Oz:: The Oz Book for 1953 

March Laumer & Irene Schneyder

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

1954  The Woozy of Oz: The Oz Book for 1954

March Laumer

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

1959  Dragons in Oz

March Laumer

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

1978  Green Dolphin of Oz

March Laumer 

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

1980  Aunt Em and Uncle Henry in Oz: A Traditional Tale of Oz

March Laumer 

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

1983  In Other Lands than Oz

       Includes: Night on the Milky Way

                          The Woozy's Tricky Beginning

                          The Griffon & the Centaur

                          Scraps & the Magic Box

                          Off-White & Little Blue Diving Helmet

                          The Year of the Woozy

                          The Cowardly Lion Changes His Name

                          The Magic Door to Oz

                          Mandy's Waitin'

                          The Woozy's Sticky End

                          November Third

Various

Kenji Miyazawa

March Laumer

Keith Laumer

Fred E. Meyer

March Laumer

Seraphim J. Sigrist

March Laumer

Paul S. Ritz & Johanna Buchner

Frank Laumer

March Laumer, Johanna Buchner & Paul S. Ritz

Kenji Miyazawa

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

Note: "The Cowardly Lion Changes His Name" was first published in 1971, in the very first issue of Oziana. Laumer’s earliest forays into Oz, his Cowardly Lion becomes the Courageous Lion and betroths a wife, and the Laumerian pattern of marrying off characters begins.

Fred Meyer's "Scraps and the Magic Box" was first published in an uncompleted form in The Baum Bugle winter 1979 issue.  The story in this collection is complete, and is harmonious with those on the mainline timeline and can be found here.  The Bugle ran a contest to finish the story, and the winning entry was published in the Autumn 1980 issue.  It has been placed here.

March Laumer's "The Woozy's Tricky Beginning" was first published in Oziana 1978, this is a cute short story of the origin of the Woozy. As with most of Laumer's work, the narrative suffers from some anachronisms and inconsistencies in its usage of Lurline, Glinda and the Sawhorse.  For a more harmonious origin-story of the Woozy, see Kim Farland's A Refugee in Oz.

Seraphim Sigrist "The Year of the Woozy" can be found in 1929 on the mainline timeline.  It's date is discussed here.

Paul Ritz and Johanna Buchner's "The Magic Door to Oz" was later published in Oziana #37 "in its original form, unaltered to fit Laumer's continuity," but also without mentioning the copyrighted names of Mr. Tumnus from The Chronicles of Narnia and the pushmi-pullyu from the Dr. Dolittle tales.

"The Woozy's Sticky End" is a sequel to The Woozy's Tricky Beginning in which the Woozy and Scraps are kidnapped by the Dewan of the Deadly Desert.

1984  The Good Witch of Oz 

March Laumer

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

1994  The Cloud King of Oz

Richard E. Blaine & March Laumer

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

1997  Beenie in Oz

March & Keith Laumer, Tyler Jones, Michael J. Michanczyk

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

1999  Ten Woodmen of Oz: The Oz Book for 1999

March Laumer

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

2000  A Farewell to Oz: The Oz Book for 2000 

March Laumer, Anita McGrew, Gerard Langa, Dina Briones

Vanitas Press; Lulu.com

Note: The prolific and controversial March Laumer was among the first of the new breed of authors to begin writing Oz stories following the close of canon in 1962, and doing so with the permission of Contemporary Books (Reilly & Lee’s successor). March knew the Famous Forty well and had even corresponded with Ruth Plumly Thompson for a time until her death. Published in low-print runs under his own Opium Books/Vanitas Press label, he released a score of Oz books, including translations of Russian author, Alexander Volkov’s Magic Land series (see Volkov's Tales of the Magic Land above) as well as non-Oz Baum titles (many of which were illustrated by Lau Shiu-Fan). 

 

Laumer’s Volkov translations are unique in that they substitute many of the Russian characters and locales for Ozian ones. This has caused some minor confusion over the years as Volkov’s "Magic Land," Goodvinia, is based on and similar to Oz, yet it is not Oz. Its history is vastly different from the one established by Baum and his successors. The appropriation of Volkovian elements in Oz was perpetuated when some (though not all) of Laumer’s Oz titles included events and characters that existed solely in Volkov’s works. Thus, unless the reader is familiar with Volkov’s writing through Laumer's translations, the appearances of characters like Oorfene Deuce and Gingemma in these books might pose some confusion.

 

It wouldn't be until much later that Laumer began to garner notoriety as some of his later books began to incorporate sexual undertones and adult themes. This gave the author a somewhat controversial reputation for being the first to taint the innocence of Oz with what a few have labeled pornography. This is a somewhat unjust accusation, however, as there are no explicit sexual scenes in any of his works. Nevertheless, the extraordinarily dense Green Dolphin of Oz does contain allusions to bestiality, incest and pedophilia, and not in an unfavorable light (hence the reason that book is noted in the Dark Side of Oz portion of this chronology). Nevertheless, Green Dolphin aside, there is much of interest here and Laumer, of all authors, made the most permanent changes in Oz, “growing up” his characters and marrying off a few of the familiar Ozian cast. 

 

Laumer is also one of the few authors to write “Oz history-in-advance” dispelling the make-believe notion that the authors were historians chronicling events that already occurred. While not everyone’s cup of tea, his books remain an interesting chapter in modern Oz history. And at long last, they're available for purchase or download, allowing everyone the opportunity to peruse this fascinating – though wildly different –  extension of the Oz mythos. Head here for a full listing.

 

An Orphan in Oz 

Jim the Cab Horse in Oz

Munchkins in Oz

Quadlings in Oz

Gillikens in Oz

Winkies in Oz

Kansas in Oz

The Musical Moose in Oz

Note: Despite being footnoted in other works, these books were never written, and represent stories Laumer had been intending on writing.

     

The Talking City of Oz 

R. Baxley, Jr.

Vanitas Press (1999, 2006)

Note: See this entry in Parallel Histories for more information.

 

1977

 

 

The Oz Encounter (originally Oz Encounter: Weird Heroes Vol. 5: Doc Phoenix

Marv Wolfman, Ted White

Byron Preiss; Pyramid books/ Reprinted by Hungry Tiger Press

Note: Adventure of the pulp hero, Doc Phoenix, as he enters the mind of a young comatose girl and discovers she has withdrawn into the fairy realm of Baum's Land of Oz. However, as events on the outside threaten to destroy Phoenix and the girl, events in Oz begin taking dramatic turns for the worse. 

 

 

 

1988    
Little Birds B.J. Rosen Hunt Books
The magic has left Oz. Glinda has gone, taking with her all of the magical creatures. The people left behind have been working to rebuild their country with little magic to aid them. Now the Guild of Alchemists are performing illegal experiments, the nobles of Oz are plotting against the Queen, and there are rumors that ancient enemies are returning. Only the Wizard has the wisdom to foresee the coming dangers, but does he have the power to stop it? Standing against the coming dark are a teenage spy, a cynical police detective, and an absent-minded inventor. Each of them has unique skills and knowledge that might be able to save all of Oz from a terrible plot to destroy the Queen, or it might just get them all killed.
     

1994

 

 

Up the Rainbow

Susan Casper

Asimov's Science Fiction; Bantam/Doubleday

Note: At Dorothy's death, her granddaughter Gale discovers firsthand that Oz is real, but isn't exactly the way Baum described it. Upon learning that Ozma's laws are keeping a number of Oz citizens from being happy, Gale goes about finding a way to fix that. This novella attempts to philosophically explore Ozma's policies through the modern-day mores of an American woman, although some may take umbrage with the author's jingoism, deconstruction of Ozma, and use of her protagonist, Gale, as a Mary-Stu who emerges as the sole wise, just, and kind-hearted person in Oz.

 

 

 

1950 on...

 

 

Whatever Happened to Dorothy of Oz? How Dorothy Gale Became a Mature Adult: Vol. 1

James L. Fuller

Privately printed (1997); Fuller Publishing (2010)

Dorothy and the Computer Demons of Oz: Featuring Dorothy Gale as a Mature Adult

James L. Fuller

Privately printed (1996); Fuller Publishing (2010)

Dorothy and the Lost Coal Mine to Oz: Featuring Dorothy Gale as a Mature Adult: Vol. 3

James L. Fuller

Privately printed (1996); Fuller Publishing (2012)

Dr. Todd and the Magical Dental Chair to Oz: Featuring Dorothy Gale as a Mature Adult: Vol. 4

James L. Fuller

Privately printed (1998); Fuller Publishing (2011)

Dorothy and Reading Help in Oz: Featuring Dorothy Gale as a Mature Adult: Vol. 5

James L. Fuller

Privately printed as Reading Help in Oz (1996); Fuller Publishing (2012)

Dorothy and Mischievous Children in Oz: Featuring Dorothy Gale as a Mature Adult: Vol. 6 James L. Fuller Privately printed as Mischievous Children Taken to Oz (1997); Fuller Publishing (2013)
The Purple Bull From Oz: Featuring Dorothy Gale as a Mature Adult James L. Fuller Privately printed (1996)
The Animals of Oz: Featuring Dorothy Gale as a Mature Adult James L. Fuller Privately printed (1998)

Note: These eight volumes feature Dorothy Gale as an adult, having left Oz after fifty years spent there. These stories constitute a parallel universe to Fuller's more traditional Oz stories, and, in fact, several of these and others were rewritten with a young Dorothy still living in Oz. See Parallel Histories for these. In these versions, Oz still uses money and the history of Ruggedo as recounted by Ruth Plumly Thompson has not occurred.

 

 

 

1995    
The Oz Kids    
1. Toto, Lost in New York Willard Carroll Hyperion Pictures (1996)
8. Underground Adventure Willard Carroll Hyperion Pictures (1997)
3. Journey Beneath the Sea Willard Carroll Hyperion Pictures (1997)
6. The Nome Prince and the Magic Belt Willard Carroll Hyperion Pictures (1996)
2. The Monkey Prince Willard Carroll Hyperion Pictures (1996)
9. Virtual Oz Willard Carroll Hyperion Pictures (1996)
5. The Return of Mombi Willard Carroll Hyperion Pictures (1997)
7. Who Stole Santa? Willard Carroll Hyperion Pictures (1996)
4. Christmas in Oz Willard Carroll Hyperion Pictures (1996)
Note: This 26 episode animated series recounts the adventures of the children of Dorothy, the Wizard, Glinda, the Cowardly Lion, Jack Pumpkinhead and the Nome King.  These episodes were compiled into nine episodes and released on VHS.  The series has not yet been released on DVD in the U.S., but in the U.K., three episodes ("A Kidnapped Santa", "On the Ice Floe" and "Christmas in Oz") are available on DVD.  The episode release number is not the same as the chronological order in which the stories take place.
     

2006

 

 

Lullaby: Volumes 1 & 2

Ben Avery, Hector Sevilla, Mike S. Miller

Alias Comics

Note: Assorted fairy tales characters converge in this Manga styled comic and journey towards the MGM version of Oz.

 

 

 

Tin Man

Stuart Moore

Sci-Fi Channel; Virgin Comics

Note: Online prequel comic to the Sci-Fi Channel's Tin Man miniseries.

 

 

 

Tin Man

Steven Long Mitchell, Craig Van Sickle

Sci-Fi Channel, RHI Entertainment

Note: Modern re-imagining, directed by Nick Willing, in which 20 year old DG (Zooey Deschanel) travels to the O.Z. where she discovers her hidden past, new and old friends, and the evil sorceress Azkadellia, who is seeking a magical emerald to cover the O.Z. in darkness. In this iteration, DG is revealed to be a great grandchild of Dorothy Gale.

 

 

 

2009    
Silver Shoes Paul Miles Schneider iUniverse
The Powder of Life Paul Miles Schneider iUniverse
Note: Well-written novels in which Baum had been a secret agent who reported the true story of Dorothy and Oz to the world, up to and including the sixth book (The Emerald City of Oz), after which Baum made up the rest. These two books have been collected into a slightly edited single volume.
     
2013    
Boz: Return to Oz Perry Orlando Poe House Publishing (2013)
Note: Dorothy Gale-Parker, 110 years old, is living in an old age home. Protected by the magical kiss of the Good Witch of the North, all of her family and friends have passed on before her. She feels desperately alone and unwanted. Trapped in an aging body, seemingly impervious to illness, she yearns to return to OZ. Her fellow residents hatch a scheme to outwit the white-coats and Dorothy finds herself once more transported to that magical land only to discover that everything has changed, and not for the better. To her horror she finds that she is wanted for murder of the two witches and the Land of OZ is in chaos. She must find her friends, clear her name and get to the root cause of the problems that plague OZ.
     
The Wizard of Oz: A Streampunk Adventure S.D. Stuart CreateSpace (2013)
The Scarecrow of Oz: A Steampunk Adventure S.D. Stuart CreateSpace (2013)
Note: There is no yellow brick road here. No emerald city. No lollipop guild. This is the Australis Penal Colony, a continent sized prison referred to the world over as the Outcast Zone. Built to contain the world's most dangerous criminals, OZ ended up the dumping ground for everything polite society deemed undesirable. From inside this place a garbled message proves Dorothy's father is still alive, trapped in a prison with only one way in and no way out. Into this place 17-year-old Dorothy must go if she wants to find her father and keep the promise she made to her dying mother.
     
2014    
Once Upon a Time: Season 3 Edward Kitsis, Adam Horowitz ABC Studios (March to May 2014)
Note: TV series set in the fictional seaside town of Storybrooke, Maine, in which the residents are actually characters from various fairy tales and other stories that were transported to the "real world" town and robbed of their original memories by the Evil Queen Regina, using a powerful curse obtained from Rumplestiltskin.  The Wicked Witch of the West, green like the MGM version, but attractive, arrives in season 3 with her winged monkeys to challenge the protagonists.
     
2049    
Alone in a Cornfield J.I. Berko Fanfiction.net
Note: The Scarecrow mourns the passing of his friends just before meeting a new one.
     

N/A

 

 

Snagglepuss and the Wizard of Oz

Hanna Barbera

Hanna Barbera

Note: Hanna Barbera’s silly and amusing album renders the story of ‘the Wizard of Oz’ a little different from both the book or the MGM film. Snagglepuss narrates throughout.

 

 

 

Star Trek #39: When you Wish Upon a Star

Len Wein 

DC comics

Star Trek #40: Mudd’s Magic

Len Wein 

DC comics

Note: Kirk and Spock visit a dimension resembling the Land of Oz that has been created within the milieu of a genius mind.

 

 

 

Dorothy - Return to Oz

Thomas Tedrow

World Publications Promotions

Note: This book has little to do with Baum’s Oz, and is more of a sequel to the MGM film. In it Dorothy’s granddaughter clicks her ruby sneakers and goes to ‘Oz’ where she meets the Wicked Witch of the West’s daughter. Not to be confused with the Disney film of a similar name or the 1964 animated special.

 

 

 

Little Oz Squad #1

Steve Ahlquist; Mike Sagara

Patchwork Press; Lulu.com

Note: A vast departure from his adult series (Oz Squad), Steve Ahlquist’s comic book about little Dot Gale and her Ozzy friends was written as a treat for the kiddies. Reprinted in trade paperback in The Complete Annotated Oz Squad: Volume 1.

 

 

 

Dorothy Returns to Oz

Shawn Billman, et. al.

Buckethead Enterprises of Oz

Note: This is a ‘What-If’ styled book and is not meant to be an historical chapter in the Oz chronology.  Not to be confused with the Disney film, animated special or Thomas Tedrow’s book (above) which bear a similar name.

 

 

 

The Wizard of Oz Returns (Game and Record)

Sid Frank; Ralph Stein

Golden Records

Note: Amusing sequel to the Wizard of Oz complete with songs and voices that attempt to match the 1939 musical, but which follows neither the thread of the MGM film nor the book. The story involves the Wizard’s return to Oz, where upon arriving, he discovers that the citizens no longer need him because peace reigns. Scarecrow is the President of a University, Cowardly Lion, the Army of Oz, and Tinman writes a personal column in the Emerald City Herald ‒ jobs none of them want. They seek the aid of the Good Witch of the North who agrees to dress up as the Wicked Witch of the West in order to frighten the people into realizing they need the Wizard after all. She takes “mean” pills in order to do this, but overdoses and believes herself to be the real Wicked Witch. Dorothy and a pail of water restore her.

 

 

 

Seven Day Magic

Edward Eager

Odyssey Classics

Note: This is not an Oz book, although the characters who find themselves in this magical land, called Oswaldoland, initially think they are in Oz, and the author makes several references to that land and its characters.

 

 

 

The Wind and the Wizard

Richard Roberts 

Emerald City Press

Note:  The protagonist of this two-volume novel travels into the action of six classic children’s books, one of which is The Marvelous Land of Oz.  Illustrated by Elizabeth Gill.

 

 

 

Mary Marvel: The Modern Wizard of Oz

(writer unknown)

Oz-Story Magazine #2; Hungry Tiger Press

Note: Funny comic from 1946 (WOW comics #48). Mary Marvel, superheroine, beats up the Scarecrow, Tin Man and a creature named the What-is-it (a take-off on John R. Neill’s Bell Snickle?), in an effort to stop them from frightening the crowds by their appearance.
     
The Wizard of Mars David L. Hewitt, Armando Busick American General Pictures, Inc.
Note: Ultra low-budget 1965 science-fiction film with John Carradine, later retitled Horrors of the Red Planet (and Alien Massacre) After a storm, four astronauts end up on a strange planet where they follow a golden road to the titular character.
     
The Lizard of Oz Richard Seltzer B & R Samizdat Express
Note: Released initially in 1974, this book is not meant to be part of the Oz series of books, but a separate and different fantasy realm based on the premise of the MGM film.
     
The Wizard of Oz Roger Phillips Oziana 1989, The International Wizard of Oz Club
Note: This page and a half short story from Oziana magazine is a modern day retelling of the Dorothy’s trip to Oz.
     

Sir Harold and the Gnome King

(Included in The Enchanter Reborn)

L. Sprague DeCamp Baen Books
Note: See this entry under Patchwork Parodies & Poems
     
Bill and the Purple Cow in Oz Chris J. Wright AuthorHouse
Note: Titular characters find themselves helping a cat and princess through the environs of Oz.  Story could be accepted in the context of the Oz books, but for the characterization and description of the Scarecrow who retains the vestige of his gift and memory from the MGM film. 
     
Fables Bill Willingham Vertigo/DC Comics
Note: Ongoing comic based on the premise that the characters of Faerie have been cast out of their homes by the Adversary and are living in a place called Fabletown in NY (with the non-human ones living in Upstate, NY.)  The Nome King has made appearances as one of the villains, and occasionally, Jack Pumpkinhead and a winged monkey named Bufkin who is Fabletown's librarian, appear.  This story is intended for teens and up.
     
The Return to Oz Callie Person www.Lulu.com
Note: Based on the MGM film and Baum's Marvelous Land of Oz, "Dorothy Gale, now fourteen, magically returns to the Land of Oz to find Oz under the monarchy of Mombi."
     
Emerald City Confidential PlayFirst HP WildGames
Note: In Emerald City Confidential, work with the world's most cunning detective in the shadowy underbelly of Oz! As P.I. Petra, you'll be lured deep into mysteries involving new foes and familiar faces; Scarecrow, Lion, and Toto included. This is Oz as you've never seen it before! Solve your detective's quest and unravel a conspiracy of magic and intrigue. Follow a case through 50 gorgeous environments, full of puzzles, witnesses, suspects, and allies. Emerald City Confidential is a brilliant new twist on the classic world of Oz!
     
Color Changing Tingle's Love Balloon Trip Vanpool Nintendo DS
Note: In this Japanese game, the third starring a character named Tingle whose mission is to have relationships with women, Tingle must dance with the princess of the world of his picture book. Along the way, he befriends Kakashi, the Scarecrow, Buriki, the Tin Woman, and Lion the Cowardly Lion, who help him solve puzzles.
     
The Dark Side of Oz Gregory Espy Lulu.com
Note: Poetry based on the characters in the MGM film.
     
The Emerald Tower Clymnestra E. Nestor Fanfiction.net
Note: Dorothy and Quince become stuck in the Emerald Tower, while on a "romantic" picnic. Tensions rise as the two try to find a way out from the merciless black "Guardians" and Dorothy confesses her feelings to Quince, and giving him a decision.
     
General to Ginger Clymnestra E. Nestor Fanfiction.net
Note: General Ginger finds herself faced with two problems. One: She has to teach Generals K and K the "art" of warfare. Two: They're very attractive.
   
Revenge of the Dark Witch of Oz: The Illustrated Screenplay Patrick Lemieux Across the Board Books (2014)
Dorothy Gale finds herself trapped in the mysterious Land of Oz and her presence threatens to re-ignite a war between magic and machines. The secret to getting home lies in the lost City of Emerald Light. Revenge Of The Dark Witch Of Oz is a science fiction/fantasy adaptation of L. Frank Baum’s The Wonderful Wizard Of Oz.
     
After Oz Percy Kiyabu Vancouver Film School
Note: Short animation: After receiving his new heart, the Tin Woodman walks the Emerald City, and finds a metallic red woman to whom he gives his heart. After she tosses it away, causing the Tin Woodman much pain, the heart lands on a green metallic woman who appears more worthy of it.
     
The Hidden Man Don (HappyHooligan2001) Fanfiction.net
Note: The Wizard hid in the back rooms of the Palace for years with no human contact. But there was one person who knew his secret and provided him companionship, Jellia Jamb.

 

For more Tales Beyond the Deadly Desert, go to the Dark Side of Oz.

 

 

Take flight to the Land of Oz